Health Tips - Electroshock

 
Electroshock

Electroshock is a procedure performed by psychiatrists that produces violent uncontrollable contractions of muscles (convulsions), similar to an epileptic seizure, by passing 70 to more than 600 volts of electricity through a patient’s brain. Patients are usually given muscle-paralyzing drugs beforehand, to reduce the risk of fractured bones, particularly of the spine, a common occurrence with earlier ECT. Electroshock can produce life-threatening complications, such as the suspension of breathing and cardiac arrest. Therefore, it is usually performed in hospitals set up to handle the emergency situations that often result.

Psychiatrist Colin Ross explains that existing ECT literature shows “there is a lot of brain damage, there is memory loss, the death rate does go up.”

Max Fink, a psychiatrist who is the “Grandfather of American ECT”, wrote in the Psychiatric Times in 2006: “the second complaint is of a persistent loss of personal memories… They do not recall the names of their children, family holidays, or personal events.”

Today, an estimated 1 million people worldwide receive electroshock each year. More than 100,000 Americans are electroshocked each year. In Australia, it was recently revealed that psychiatrists had electroshocked 55 toddlers age four and younger. In the UK, three year olds have been electroshocked.

One of America’s leading mental health “patients’ rights” groups—the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)—recently endorsed the use of electroshock on pregnant women. It is not surprising that in 2008, NAMI listed an ECT machine manufacturer, Cyberonics, as one of its corporate sponsors.

At the same time, the FDA reports pregnant women miscarrying following ECT. Studies show that, in addition to the risk of death, the fetus can suffer malnutrition, dehydration and violent injury.

Ernest Hemingway, American author, committed suicide shortly after receiving ECT at the Menninger Clinic in 1961. He is reported to have said to his biographer, “Well, what is the sense of ruining my head and erasing my memory, which is my capital, and putting me out of business? It was a brilliant cure but we lost the patient…”

All other medical disciplines, as well as professions such as construction, go to great lengths to prevent people from being hurt or killed by electrical shock… Patients who have convulsions are given anticonvulsant drugs to prevent convulsions because they are well known to damage the brain. So, why has electroshock not been banned? Electroshock brings in an estimated $5 billion annually to the psychiatric industry in the U.S. alone. Covered largely by insurance, ECT psychiatrists average twice the income of other psychiatrists.

The bottom line is that electroshock is not therapeutic and is an assault on human rights. Click here, as I have, to find email contact links for your Congressional representatives. Let them know that electroshock must be banned immediately.

Depression and other emotional problems can be handled naturally.

Best of health,

Print This Page

Dr. Pepi

 
Click here to order supplements Contact Dr Pepi's Office